Post It Poetry

Write, peel, stick. Write, peel, stick. There’s something incredibly satisfying about jotting ideas down on Post-It notes, Especially for those of us who feel more comfortable crafting with words rather than sketching lines and shapes, Post-it poetry is an easy way to help children look more closely and respond to works of art. All you need is a pad of sticky notes and pencil per student!

Write, peel, stick. Write, peel, stick. There’s something incredibly satisfying about jotting ideas down on Post-It notes, Especially for those of us who feel more comfortable crafting with words rather than sketching lines and shapes, Post-it poetry is an easy way to help children look more closely and respond to works of art. All you need is a pad of sticky notes and pencil per student!

Give each student a stack of sticky notes and take turns writing a single word or phrase on a note that describes what you see in the work of art. Continue for as long as possible without repeating words. If someone gets stuck, consider these prompts to inspire more words and phrases:

  • What shapes, lines, colors, figures, objects do you see?
  • What is happening?
  • What is the mood of the artwork? or What feelings does this art give you?
  • What do you like about the artwork?

Take a minute or two just to look at the artwork, then make yourselves at home and start a round of Post-it poetry!

The beauty of Post-it poetry is that your writing canvas is small. You don't really have room for lengthy explanations. This type of response poetry is more about the viewer—what do you see? What do you feel? What do you wonder? All you need to do is write down what immediately comes to mind as you let your eyes gaze and mind wander.

One you've accumulated a good stack of words, start arranging into lines of poetry - whatever surface works best for you - floor, desk, clipboard. The lines can be as short of long as you like. Once your masterpiece is complete, snap a photo, paste to poster board, laminate or simply tape to a piece of cardboard. Displays work best when shown with the chosen artwork.

One you've accumulated a good stack of words, start arranging into lines of poetry - whatever surface works best for you - floor, desk, clipboard. The lines can be as short of long as you like.

Once your masterpiece is complete, snap a photo, paste to poster board, laminate or simply tape to a piece of cardboard. Displays work best when shown with the chosen artwork.

I like to encourage kids to take the lead by having them select a favorite work of art - this works in a gallery setting, using the internet or with several images of your choosing on a projector.

I like to encourage kids to take the lead by having them select a favorite work of art - this works in a gallery setting, using the internet or with several images of your choosing on a projector.

Wouldn't it be nice to sit in front of Monet's Water Lillies? Maybe next semester! :)

Wouldn't it be nice to sit in front of Monet's Water Lillies? Maybe next semester! :)

Out of the box idea: use your family as inspiration for a large piece of homemade poetry - the bigger the better! (And how cool would it look on framed!) Special thanks to http://playfullearning.net for the inspiration!

Out of the box idea: use your family as inspiration for a large piece of homemade poetry - the bigger the better! (And how cool would it look on framed!)

Special thanks to http://playfullearning.net for the inspiration!